Tuesday, May 9, 2017

Summit County Probate Court helping developmentally disabled children transition to adulthood with new video

AKRON, Ohio -- Summit County Probate Court released a new video titled "Guardianship: As your Special Needs Child Becomes An Adult," to help parents of developmentally disabled children make decisions about their child's transition into adulthood.

The video is meant to inform, address issues and answer questions parents may have as their children approach age 18.

The 39-minute-long video can be viewed through the Probate Court's website at or at https://vimeo.com/215861018.

"I recognize that it can be a difficult decision to journey on the path from parent to legal guardian," Probate Court Judge Elinore Marsh Stormer said in a news release. "This video acknowledges this reality and provides an important piece in our overall effort to protect our wards and to support their guardians."

The video shows parents Fiovi, who talks about her son Nicholas, and Mary, who discusses her experience becoming the legal guardian of her son Scott. 

They each speak with Stormer, who guides them through the process of making a decision in the best interest of their children.

The video can be used in tandem with a video previously released by the Probate Court titled "Guardianship of Persons With Developmental Disabilities." The videos together provide information to support caregivers and loved ones of children with special needs.

Guardian training is mandated by the Ohio Supreme Court. Summit County Probate Court created the first comprehensive video training in Ohio.

There are 18 videos available for online viewing through the Probate Court's website that cover issues ranging from advanced directives to marriage licenses. They can be viewed at www.summitohioprobate.com.

Full Article & Source:
Summit County Probate Court helping developmentally disabled children transition to adulthood with new video


Jane said...

I saw NASGA's comment at the article itself and I agree. I'd also go a step further to point out that the probate court makes alot of money off of disabled children who become adults.

Lisa said...

After what I've been through, it's hard to see anything but nefarious purposes here. Developmentally disabled children have it hard enough without losing their rights for good when they become adults.