Monday, April 21, 2014

Claims of abuse at local nursing home

 

SAN ANTONIO -- Several senior citizens, some of them U.S. military veterans, have filed a lawsuit against a local nursing home, claiming severe abuse and neglect.

Parklane West Healthcare Center on the Northeast Side is being sued by three San Antonio families. The attorney representing the families, Marynell Maloney, held a news conference Tuesday. Maloney claims her clients have been repeatedly abused and neglected over several years.

The family of one man, a colonel who has since passed away, claims he had fallen one day but didn't receive treatment for his pain until 14 hours later.


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Claims of abuse at local nursing home

Suspended lawyer seeks removal of disciplinary judge


Judge William "Bill" O'Neil
A suspended lawyer who practiced law extensively in the gay community and who is fighting additional state Bar allegations argued Wednesday that Arizona's top disciplinary judge should be removed from her case because he is biased against gays.

Jane O. Ross testified that presiding Disciplinary Judge William "Bill" O'Neil violated her rights and manipulated a previous disciplinary case against her because she is a lesbian who challenges judicial authority and fought for an anti-discrimination rule on behalf of gay lawyers.

"It is exactly that discrimination I'm alleging," Ross said during a hearing to determine whether O'Neil should be disqualified from the case. "I pushed both of his buttons. ... I challenged judges, and I'm homosexual."

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Suspended lawyer seeks removal of disciplinary judge

Scammers Bilk Elderly Women Out of Thousands in Queens, Police Say


QUEENS — Thieves have been targeting elderly women — including one who was 86 years old — in Queens to scam them out of tens of thousands of dollars by promising them winning lottery tickets and large cash sums, police said.

At least two such cases recently took place within the 102nd Precinct, which covers Kew Gardens, Woodhaven and Richmond Hill, police officials said.

And police sources said that several similar incidents targeting elderly women recently took place in Forest Hills as well. Details were not immediately available about the additional incidents or if they were related to the ones in the 102nd Precinct.

In the latest incident, which occurred in Kew Gardens on April 9, a couple approached an 86-year-old woman on Lefferts Boulevard, near Cuthbert Road, according to Deputy Inspector Henry Sautner, the precinct's commanding officer.

The couple told the women that they found $150,000 and they were willing to give her $50,000, but they would first need a $10,000 finder’s fee.

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Scammers Bilk Elderly Women Out of Thousands in Queens, Police Say

Sunday, April 20, 2014

Tonite on T.S. Radio: California probate corruption: Ernest Moore from the Justice Channel

Guest: Ernest Moore is a family therapist intern in the state of California and has worked in child protective services for Los Angeles County Children & Family Services. He is an investigative journalist and social justice activist in the Los Angeles area, he is the creator and host of the “Justice Channel” internet radio show on Blog Talk Radio  http://www.blogtalkradio.com/elm  and publishes commentaries and reports to his blog “The Justice Channel"

http://www.thejusticechannel.blogspot.com/.

Ernest Moore is currently in a college degree program for paralegal studies. Contacts for Ernest Moore:  tjc@corbettstudios.com

Ernest Moore is a victim of the Los Angeles Superior courts in the county of Los Angeles, California. He has been involved in a probate case with his family for almost 10 years. He has experienced the corruption of two judges that were presiding over his case Aviva K. Bobb and Michael I. Levanas, over the years. The Los Angeles probate court has done nothing to protect his family’s estate and has allowed the court appointed conservators and trustees to waste and steal almost $4,000,000.00 from his mother’s trusts.  This has caused financial hardships for his family and has torn his immediate family apart! Mr. Moore has reported this corruption to law enforcement agencies in Los Angeles as well as the Los Angeles County Board of Supervisors for years. So far, nothing has been done to stop the corruption in the Los Angeles Superior Court Probate Department 11. The CA BAR as well as the CA Commission on Judicial Performance has refused to take any actions against the judges in his case as well as the corrupt court appointed attorney for his mother.

5:00 pm PST … 6:00 pm MST7:00 pm CST 8:00 pm EST

LISTEN TO THE SHOW LIVE or listen to the archive later

California seniors have highest poverty rate, study finds


 Allen Stross of Berkeley started working at age 13. He's been a delivery boy, a sign painter, a Navy sailor and a photographer for the Detroit Free Press. Now, at age 90, he and his wife live on about $21,000 a year. After they pay for rent and medications, they're left with just $416 a month.
Allen Stross - Photo: Lea Suzuki, The Chronicle 

"No restaurants. No movies. No new clothes. We look for a lot of freebies," he said. "But I try not to worry about things I can't control, such as the past or the future. My wife's a Buddhist. That helps."

Stross and his wife, a retired art history teacher, are among a growing throng of formerly middle-class Americans who find themselves in poverty as seniors. For about 6.3 million seniors nationwide living below the poverty line, that means eating most meals at free dining rooms, rarely turning up the heat, rationing medications and praying that emergencies never strike.

California, with its high cost of living and health care, leads the nation in the percentage of older adults living in poverty, according to a 2013 report by the Kaiser Family Foundation. Twenty percent of California adults over age 65 live below the poverty threshold of about $16,000 annually, when taking into account the higher cost of housing and health care.

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California seniors have highest poverty rate, study finds

Young and Old Share Support at Oregon Housing Complex




At a special housing development in Oregon, families who adopt foster children live side by side with seniors who volunteer their time in exchange for affordable rent. The NewsHour's Cat Wise reports how members of the intergenerational community find support and connection together.

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Young and old share support at Oregon housing community

Saturday, April 19, 2014

Lawyer ethics violations in New York are punished too slowly and inconsistently handled, study finds

 
A study of lawyer discipline cases in New York has found that punishment is slow and sanctions for similar conduct are inconsistent.

New York University law professor Stephen Gillers studied lawyer discipline cases dating to 1982 and read 577 court opinions imposing sanctions in the last six years. He found several instances of unacceptable delays and disparity in punishment in courts in different parts of the state, the New York Times reports in an op-ed.

In upstate New York, appeals courts rarely explain decisions on sanctions, and often they don’t follow earlier precedents, the story says.

“Perhaps most troubling,” the Times says, “is the overall lack of transparency that pervades the system. Unlike 40 other states, New York does not inform the public of pending charges against lawyers. It is also unnecessarily difficult to learn when a lawyer has been officially sanctioned.”

The Times includes some examples of problematic cases. One lawyer accused of stealing client funds was allowed to continue practicing for three years before he was disbarred. In another case, a lawyer received a two-and-a-half year suspension for filing false documents, making false statements and improperly notarizing a client’s signature. But a different lawyer accused of similar conduct received only a formal rebuke.

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Lawyer ethics violations in New York are punished too slowly and inconsistently handled, study finds

Even After Doctors Are Sanctioned or Arrested, Medicare Keeps Paying


Mark Greenbain and Anmy Tran (Photos courtesy of WDIV Detroit)

In August 2011, federal agents swept across the Detroit area, arresting doctors, pharmacists and other health professionals accused of running a massive scheme to defraud Medicare.

The following month, several of those arrested —including psychiatrist Mark Greenbain and podiatrist Anmy Tran — were suspended from billing the state's Medicaid program for the poor.

"Health care fraud steals funds from programs designed to benefit patients, and we all pay for it," U.S. Attorney Barbara McQuade said in a press release at the time of the arrests. "We hope that the strength of our efforts will have a deterrent effect."

But the indictment and Medicaid suspensions didn't deter Medicare from continuing to allow the doctors to treat elderly and disabled patients — and billing taxpayers for their services.

In 2012, Medicare paid Greenbain more than $862,000, according to newly released data on Medicare payments to physicians. Tran received $155,000.

Greenbain and Tran were among dozens of doctors identified by ProPublica who Medicare kept paying after they were suspended or terminated from state Medicaid programs, indicted or charged with fraud, or had settled civil allegations of submitting false claims to Medicare.

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Even After Doctors Are Sanctioned or Arrested, Medicare Keeps Paying

Friday, April 18, 2014

Better Rules for Bad Lawyers


In 2009, a lawyer in New York helped his client settle a claim for $30,000. The lawyer then had the check issued in his own name, deposited it into his own account and used all of the funds for himself. The client demanded his money to no avail.

It took more than three years before the lawyer was disbarred for stealing a client’s funds. During all that time, the lawyer, who already had a history of serious disciplinary infractions, kept working.

This is a disturbingly common story in New York, which has more lawyers than any other state. Punishments for those who violate obligations to a client — if not the law — are slow, inconsistently levied and often hidden from the public.

Professional discipline is essential to the integrity of any legal system. Unfortunately in New York, the process for dealing with lawyer misconduct is “deficient in design and operation,” writes Stephen Gillers, a professor at New York University School of Law in an article to be published next month in N.Y.U.’s Journal of Legislation and Public Policy.

Professor Gillers examined attorney-discipline cases going back to 1982 and all 577 court opinions imposing sanctions issued over the past six years. In addition to the many instances of “unacceptable” delay in the official response to complaints about lawyers, he documents the great disparity in the way similar violations are handled by courts in different parts of the state.

For example, a lawyer who filed false documents, made false statements and improperly notarized a client’s signature was suspended for two and a half years by the appeals court in Manhattan. But, in Brooklyn, comparable actions by a different lawyer resulted only in a formal rebuke but not a suspension. In upstate New York, appellate courts rarely explain the reasons for their decision to sanction or not sanction, and, when they do, they often don’t follow their own earlier rulings.

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Better Rules for Bad Lawyers